Petite Sirah vs Syrah: All about Difference and Similarity.

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Petite Sirah vs Syrah

There is a lot of debate surrounding the difference between Petite Sirah vs Syrah. Some people say that they are the same, while others claim distinct taste differences between the two. Do you know the difference between them? Many people don’t, but they are two different wines. 

Petite Sirah is a dark purple wine full-bodied with aromas of black pepper and chocolate. Syrah is a medium- to light-bodied red wine with blackberry, plum, and pepper flavors. 

Petite Sirah vs Syrah All about Difference and Similarity.

If you’re looking for a darker red wine, Petite Sirah is the way. But if you want something lighter, Syrah is the better option. No matter what your preference, though, both wines are delicious!

In this blog post, we will explore the different characteristics of petite Sirah and syrah wines to decide for yourself which one you prefer. We will also discuss where these wines come from and how to best enjoy them. So, if you’re curious about petite Sirah vs Syrah, read on!

What Is Petite Sirah?

Petite Sirah is a dark purple wine full-bodied with aromas of black pepper and chocolate. It is made from the Petite Sirah grape, a cross between the peloursin and syrah grapes.

The petite Sirah grape is known for its thick skin, which gives the wine its dark color. The thick skin also makes this grape resistant to pests and disease. This makes it easier to grow than some other grapes, which is one reason why petite Sirah wines are fairly common.

Petite Sirah wines are medium to full-bodied with high tannin levels. They typically have flavors of blackberry, plum, and pepper. These wines are often used as a blending grape, but they can also be made into varietal wines.

Characteristics of Petite Sirah:

  • Wine type: Petite Sirah
  • Varietal: 100% Petite Sirah
  • Origin: France
  • AVA: Bordeaux
  • Sweetness: Dry
  • Body: Full-bodied
  • Tannin: High
  • Acidity: Medium Plus
  • Ageability: 2 – 5 years
  • Serving temperature: 16-18°C
  • Cellaring: Not recommended
  • Decanting: 30 minutes
  • Food Pairing: Grilled meats, roasted vegetables, hearty stews
  • Cheese Pairing: Aged cheddar, Gruyere, Parmesan
  • Dessert Pairing: Chocolate cake, brownies, fruitcake

History of Petite Sirah

The petite Sirah grape was created in 1884 by French scientist Pierre Viala. He crossed the peloursin and Syrah grapes to create this new grape variety.

The petite Sirah grape was then brought to California in the early 1900s. It was originally planted as a blending grape, but it soon gained popularity as a varietal wine.

Petite Sirah wines were first commercially produced in the 1940s. However, they didn’t become widely available until the 1970s.

Where Does Petite Sirah Come From?

Petite Sirah grapes are grown in many different regions around the world. Some of the most popular Petite Sirah wines come from California, Australia, and France.

Petite Sirah wines from California are typically full-bodied with blackberry and pepper flavors. These wines often have a higher alcohol content than other petite Sirahs.

Australian petite Sirahs are usually lighter in body with flavors of plum and spice. These wines often have less alcohol than their Californian counterparts.

French petite Sirahs are typically the darkest and most full-bodied of the bunch. They often have flavors of blackberry, plum, and chocolate.

Some Producers of Good Quality Petite Sirah

– Bogle Vineyards

– Dashe Cellars

– Turley Wine Cellars

– Ridge Vineyards

Top 10 Popular Petite Sirah Wines

– Bogle Petite Sirah

– Dashe Petite Sirah

– Turley Petite Sirah

– Ridge Petite Sirah

– Robert Biale petite sirah

– Ps I love you petite Sirah

– Stags’ Leap petite sirah

– Pepperwood Grove Petite Sirah

– Epiphany Petite Sirah

– Cakebread Cellars Petite Sirah

How To Enjoy Petite Sirah

Petite Sirah is a versatile wine that can be enjoyed with various foods. It pairs well with grilled meats, roasted vegetables, and hearty stews. Petite Sirah is also a good choice for drinking on its own or with dessert.

When serving Petite Sirah, it is best to decant the wine for at least 30 minutes. This will help to soften the tannins and allow the flavors to develop. Petite Sirah should be served at room temperature or slightly cooler. 

How To Enjoy Petite Sirah

Some Health Benefits of Petite Sirah

– May help to prevent cancer

– May improve heart health

– May improve cognitive function

– May help to prevent diabetes

– May help to reduce inflammation

Possible Side Effects of Petite Sirah

– May cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

– May interact with certain medications

How To Store and Keep Your Wine

Petite Sirah is a wine that can be enjoyed young or aged. If you plan on drinking your Petite Sirah within the next year, it can be stored in a cool, dark place. If you want to age your Petite Sirah, it should be stored in a wine cellar or fridge.

When storing Petite Sirah, it is important to keep the bottles horizontal. This will help to prevent the cork from drying out and shrinking. Petite Sirah should be kept in a cool, dark place with a constant temperature. 

The ideal storage temperature for petite Sirah is 55°F (13°C).

How Long Does Petite Sirah Last?

Petite Sirah can be enjoyed young or aged. If you plan on drinking your petite Sirah within the next year, it can be stored in a cool, dark place. If you want to age your petite Sirah, it should be stored in a wine cellar or fridge.

The average shelf life of petite Sirah is 5-10 years. However, properly stored Petite Sirah can last for 20 years or more. 

Steps To Buying a Petite Sirah

– Check the color of the wine. It should be dark purple or black.

– Smell the wine. It should have the aromas of blackberry, plum, and pepper.

– Taste the wine. It should be full-bodied with high tannin levels.

– Choose a wine from a reputable producer (Bogle Vineyards, Dashe Cellars, Turley Wine Cellars, and Ridge Vineyards).

Styles of Petite Sirah

– Bogle Petite Sirah: This wine is full-bodied with blackberry and pepper flavors.

– Dashe Petite Sirah: This wine is lighter in body with flavors of plum and spice.

– Turley Petite Sirah: This wine is the darkest and most full-bodied bunch. It has flavors of blackberry, plum, and chocolate.

What Is Syrah?

Syrah is a medium- to light-bodied red wine with blackberry, plum, and pepper flavors. It is made from the syrah grape, which is native to the Rhône region of France. Syrah wines are typically full-bodied with high tannin levels.

The Syrah grape was brought to Australia in the early 1800s by James Busby. It quickly became popular and is now the most planted red grape in Australia. Australian syrah wines are typically fruitier than French syrahs.

Characteristics of Syrah

  • Wine type: Medium-bodied red
  • Origin: France
  • Grape variety: Syrah
  • Aromas and flavors: Blackberry, plum, pepper
  • Body: Medium to full-bodied
  • Tannins: High
  • Acidity: Medium to high
  • Ageability: 2-10 years

Where Does Syrah Come From?

The Italian produce what seems primarily designed for whites: fresh yet delicate citrus scents accented by floral aromas. The Californian versions boast a more jammy quality with intense fruit flavors. The most popular Syrah wines come from Australia, France, Italy, and California. The Aussies offer a lighter body with spices like blackberry or plum that give way to pepper notes in some examples. At the same time, the French have darker colors due to their use of oak aging, which results in more full-bodied flavors, including those associated with red berries such as plums, alongside hints of woody skeletons lurking beneath your tongue’s surface finish. 

Syrah grapes come from worldwide, but some countries produce more than others. For instance, Australia produces lighter-bodied wines with spice and blackberry flavors, while California has an alcohol level between 12%-14%. The French variety is by far darkest – it often has characteristics such as plum or pepper in them!

How To Enjoy Syrah

Learn how to enjoy Syrah with food by following these easy tips. First, the wine should be served at room temperature or slightly cooler so that its flavors can develop fully before you start eating any of your favorite meals! You’ll also want some patience- this red tends to taste great and linger in one’s mouth longer than most wines do–a true sign of quality enforcement here, folks!.

Syrah is a powerful grape that can stand up to strong flavors. The best way of enjoying it? Enjoy with food! Pairing this wine goes well on its own or in various recipes like hearty stews and roasts (especially lamb). But if you’re looking for something stronger than water-based dishes, try one sip straight out of Napa valley – you won’t regret your choice.

This bold red would also be perfect alongside some chocolate cake for dessert wine matched better than most lighter-bodied whites (think sauvignon blanc), which will allow you to savor all those rich flavors without feeling overwhelmed by acids found only

Some Health Benefits of Syrah

– Syrah has been shown to improve heart health.

– The antioxidants in Syrah can help protect against cancer.

– Syrah can help reduce the risk of stroke.

– Syrah can help improve cognitive function.

– The polyphenols in Syrah can help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Possible Side Effects of Syrah

– Syrah may cause headaches, stomach upset, dizziness, dry mouth, and allergic reactions in some people.

How To Store and Keep Your Wine

You’ll want to keep your wine in a cool, dark place when it comes to storage. The ideal temperature for storing wine is between 50 and 55 degrees Fahrenheit. You’ll also want to ensure that the bottle is stored upright so that the cork doesn’t dry out. If you’re planning on storing your wine for more than a year, you may want to consider investing in a wine fridge.

Keeping your wine once you’ve opened it means you’ll want to consume it within a few days. If you don’t think you’ll be able to finish the bottle within that time frame, you can always transfer it to a smaller vessel like a half-bottle or carafe. Be sure to seal it tightly and store it in the fridge.

How Long Does Petite Syrah Last?

Petite Syrah can last for up to 10 years if stored properly. However, it is best consumed within the first few years after making it.

If you’re planning on drinking it within the next year or two, you can store it in a cool, dark place. But if you’re looking to age your wine, you’ll need to invest in a wine fridge.

Steps To Buying a Syrah

– Decide what style of Syrah you prefer: light and fruity or bold and tannic.

– Consider where the wine is from. Syrah grapes are grown worldwide, so wines made from them can vary greatly in taste.

– Choose a budget. Wines made from Syrah grapes can range from around $10 to $100 or more.

– Ask your local wine shop for recommendations. They can help you find a wine that fits your taste and budget.

Styles of Syrah.

– Light and fruity: These wines are usually from cooler climates and have lower alcohol levels. They can be refreshing and easy to drink.

– Bold and tannic: These wines are usually from warm climates and have higher alcohol levels. They can be full-bodied and intense.

Petite Sirah vs Syrah: What Are The Differences and Similarities?

Synonymously with “Syrah” – they are two different grape varietals. Petite Sirah is a cross between Peloursin and Syrah, while true Syrah is thought to be a cross between Mondeuse Blanc and Dureza.

While both wines share some similarities, some key differences set them apart. Let’s take a closer look at petite Sirah vs Syrah.

Taste.

The taste of Petite Sirah is very similar to that of Syrah. Both wines are full-bodied and tannic, with blackberry, pepper, and spice flavors. The main difference between the two wines is that petite Sirah is usually sweeter than Syrah.

Body.

Petite Sirah is a full-bodied wine, while Syrah is typically lighter in the body. Petite Sirah will feel richer and more velvety on your palate, while Syrah may be easier to drink.

Price.

Petite Sirah tends to be less expensive than Syrah since it is not as well-known. However, both wines can range from around $10 to $100 or more.

How to serve.

Petite Sirah is best served at room temperature, while Syrah is best served slightly chilled.

See more: How Many Glasses Are In a Bottle of Wine?

Pairings.

Pairing food and wine can be a tricky thing. The most important rule to remember when pairing your dish with an appropriate glass of vino, though it may seem simple enough on the surface level- drink what you enjoy!

There are no stringent codes regarding how much each person should consume from their meal. Rather, just ensure that both parties enjoy them by making confident choices that are compatible throughout all courses served or available during this special occasion/meal experience.

We’ve got you covered for those who require a more comprehensive list of what to drink with what. When it comes to petite Sirah, it is best served alongside hearty meals such as red meat or game. On the other hand, Syrah pairs well with lamb or beef dishes.

Some recipes for Petite Sirah:

– Roasted lamb with petite Sirah

– Beef short ribs with petite Sirah

– Braised chicken with petite Sirah

Some recipes for Syrah:

– Rack of lamb with Syrah

– Beef tenderloin with Syrah

– Mushroom risotto with Syrah

Aging Potential.

Petite Sirah has the potential to age for up to 10 years, while Syrah can last for up to 15 years. However, both wines are best consumed within the first few years after making them.

Tannins.

Tannins are responsible for the astringent, dry feeling you get in your mouth when you drink wine. They come from grape skins, seeds, and stems and can make a wine taste bitter. Petite Sirah has more tannins than Syrah, making it a bit more drying on your palate.

Acidity.

Acidity is what gives the wine its tangy, zippy flavor. Petite Sirah is usually more acidic than Syrah, making it seem sharper on your palate.

Alcohol Content.

Petite Sirah and Syrah have high alcohol levels, typically around 14%.

Color.

Petite Sirah is a deep, inky purple color, while Syrah is usually a bit lighter in color with hues of ruby or garnet.

Grape Variety.

Grape Variety of Petite Sirah and Syrah

The Syrah grape has a blue-black shade with small, round berries and thick skin similar to Cabernet Sauvignon.

However, it’s susceptible to dry seasons, so vine growers prefer growing towards hillsides for more density in the final product – this helps produce better quality wine because there is less risk of spoilage when exposed to too much sunlight during their brief ripening period!

Although Syrah can grow hot or cold depending on what region they’re grown in, it prefers plenty of luminosity.

Shiraz is a versatile grape that can be grown in many regions worldwide. The best place to grow it would likely depend upon your taste. Still, some people find greater success with Petit Sirah when they plant them close by or under shade trees such as those found on estate vineyards where quality wine production has been going forward for generations.

Some scientists say an optimum range of certain key temperatures might even exist during which fruit vines tend not just flourish–they explode into flavor!

The grape known as Petite Sirah is often used to make wine, but some people still blend it with other wines. This fruit requires plenty of sunlight and grows best at hilltops where the flavor becomes meaty; lowland plants produce fruity jamlike flavors instead!

Soil.

Petite Sirah grows best in well-drained soils that are high in limestone. Syrah can grow in various soils, but it thrives in sandy loam or clay.

Does the soil have any effect on the quality of the wine? The type of soil in which the grapes are grown can affect the quality of the wine. Grapes grown in well-drained soils that are high in limestone tend to produce higher quality wines.

Petite Sirah vs Syrah: Which One Should You Choose?

– If you’re looking for a wine that will age well, petite Sirah is a good choice.

If you’re looking for a less drying wine on your palate, Syrah is a good choice.

– If you’re looking for a wine with high alcohol content, petite Sirah or Syrah would be a good choice.

– If you’re looking for a wine with a deep, inky purple color, petite Sirah is the right choice.

– If you’re looking for a versatile grape that can be grown in many regions worldwide, Syrah is a good choice.

Ultimately, it comes down to personal preference. Try both and see which one you like best!

FAQs

How Important Are The Terms “Old World” and “New World” Regarding Wine?

The terms “old world” and “new world” are used to describe the style of wine. Old-world wines are typically more traditional in style, while new-world wines are usually more modern in style.

See more: What Are The Differences between new world and old world wine?

Do Petite Sirah Wines Need To Be Aged?

No, petite Sirah wines do not need to be aged. However, they will become more complex and smooth if you age them.

Can Petite Sirah Wines Be Blended?

Yes, Petite Sirah wines can be blended. Oftentimes, winemakers will blend Petite Sirah with other varietals to create a more well-rounded and balanced wine. Some of the most common wines to blend with Petite Sirah are Zinfandel, Grenache, and Mourvèdre.

When blending wines, it is important to take into consideration the different characteristics of each varietal. For example, Zinfandel tends to be high in alcohol and have intense fruit flavors, while Mourvèdre is known for being earthy and smoky. By taking the time to understand the flavor profiles of each grape variety, you can create a truly unique and delicious wine.

What Glass to Use for Petite Sirah vs Syrah

The best glass to use for petite Sirah is a Bordeaux glass. The best glass to use for Syrah is a Burgundy glass.

Which Wine Is Better for Different Occasions?

– If you’re looking for a wine to drink with food, petite Sirah is a good choice.

– If you’re looking for a wine to drink on its own, Syrah is a good choice.

– If you’re looking for a casual wine to drink with friends, petite Sirah or Syrah would be a good choice.

– If you’re looking for a special occasion wine, Petite Sirah is the right choice.

How Much Should I Expect To Pay for Petite Sirah vs Syrah?

Petite Sirah wines typically cost more than syrah wines. However, many different factors can affect the price of wine, such as the quality of the grape, the region where it was grown, and the winemaker.

Do I Need To Decant Petite Sirah or Syrah?

No, you do not need to decant petite Sirah or Syrah. However, if you decant them, it will allow the wines to breathe and open up, giving them more flavor and complexity.

How Long Will Petite Sirah or Syrah Last after I Open The Bottle?

The average lifespan of an unopened bottle of Petite Sirah or Syrah is approximately 5-10 years. Once the bottle is opened, Petite Sirah and syrah wines last for up to four days after opening. However, they are best consumed within the first two days after opening.

Petite Sirah and Syrah wines can age well, developing deeper and more complex flavors over time. If you plan on aging your wine, it is best to store the bottles in a cool, dark place with consistent temperature and humidity. Be sure to check on your wine periodically, as older wines are susceptible to spoilage. If you have any questions regarding a specific wine, please contact the winery directly.

See more: What Wine Should We Pair With Lamb?

Conclusion

Now that you know all about Petite Sirah wine vs Syrah, it’s time to put this knowledge into practice. Be sure to ask your local wine merchant any questions and taste as many different types of each wine as possible. With a little bit of effort, you’ll be able to find the perfect petite Sirah or Syrah for your palate and enhance your enjoyment of these delicious wines. 

It’s important to remember that capturing their unique flavors is essential for an optimal wine-drinking experience. Pay attention to the flavors and aromas of each wine and try to recreate them at home. And who knows? You may even start making your wine at home!

Questions are always encouraged, as they help expand your understanding of the topic at hand. If you have any questions about petite Sirah vs Syrah or anything else related to wine, don’t hesitate to reach out. We would be happy to answer them for you. In addition, be sure to check out our website for more useful information on wine. Thanks for reading!

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Anthony Michelin

Anthony Michelin

Founder

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